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Fence installation costs 30% more in Dallas Fort Worth than in the rest of Texas. Good fences might make good neighbors — but bad fences can put a huge dent in your wallet. 

Dallas fence repair is a much more affordable option for most area homeowners. There are plenty of DIY tasks you can handle, from repainting and restaining your boards to removing minor rust from your wrought iron fence.

And even if you have to hire a fence contractor, hiring a local fence repair service costs thousands less than a new Dallas fence installation.

Almost our entire staff owns homes in the Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex. We know a home here isn't complete without a fence.

We want to keep the one you currently own standing for as long as possible. So let's answer your biggest burning questions about DFW fences.

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Table of contents

Our Criteria

❌ Deal Breakers

✅ The Bare Minimum

🔥 Above And Beyond

How it works?

Sign up for HOMR → Receive a confirmation text from our team → Schedule your first spray → Manage everything in one place.

No contracts, no cancellation fees. Service is paid in advance - cancellation before full payment will result in a balance due of pest control treatment ONLY.

Should I Repair or Replace My Existing Fence?

Do you need a new fence, or can you salvage your existing fence with minor repairs?  The choice between fence repair and replacement significantly impacts your home budget — a new fence costs about $4,000 in Dallas Fort Worth.

If you're unsure whether to replace or simply repair your residential fence, there are telltale signs you can use to make that decision. 

8 Signs You Can Repair Your Fence

In these 8 cases, you can repair your fence without major renovation most of the time.

  1. Your fence paint or stain looks rough. The best practice in Dallas is to restain or repaint your fence every 3-4 years. A well-maintained cedar fence can last 15-20 years! So, if you notice chipped paint, fix it quickly before that area starts absorbing moisture
  2. Your fence leans. You don’t need to take down your entire fence to fix a bad lean. You should be able to get it back upright with a few braces, and replacing any bad supports
  3. Your fence is hole-y. Holes in your fence are normal and easy to replace — but be sure to check their source first. Make sure you aren't dealing with termites, Argentine ants or other Dallas area pests. If there are no signs of infestation, simply replace the affected boards. If you have pests, replace one board on either side of the damaged wood as well.
  4. Your fence is being undermined. Holes under your fence don’t require any fence repair. Call your local dog trainer, or a good pest control company depending on who’s digging the holes. .
  5. Your fence's gate is crooked. Gate repair is a minor task that can be handled by a Dallas handyman service. You do not need a permit for this type of project.
  6. Your fence has a support group. Don’t let plants lean on your fence. Live oak and crepe myrtle branches are heavy. They'll damage your fence over time. The same is true of large landscaping bushes. Trim bushes and trees 6-12’ away from your fence line annually.
  7. There are signs of minor rot, mildew or water damage. Jump on the chance to fix any sign of water damage or rot, no matter how small. Rot and mildew spread faster than anticipated — replace damaged boards now and save yourself from a full fence replacement next year. Make sure your lawn is well mowed and maintained near your fence line so it doesn’t wick moisture onto your boards.
  8. Your metal fence is rusty. Rust isn't pretty, but it doesn't mean the end of your fence. You can get rid of surface rust with a wire brush and sandpaper. Dallas fence experts generally use a commercial rust remover with oxalic acid
DID YOU KNOW: You can have barbed wire on your Dallas fence in certain circumstances! Barbed wire is permitted by City Hall if your fence is over 6 feet above grade and doesn't project past your property line.  

5 Signs You Need a New Fence

Sadly, not every fence can be saved. Here are 5 signs you need a new one.

  • Your fence costs too much to maintain. With apologies to dog lovers, we call this the “Old Yeller” situation. Are you spending too much to patch up your fence every year? If your annual fence repair bills are over $400, it's time to call a fence installation company.
  • The fence has significant wood rot. If more than 25% of the boards are rotted or covered in mildew, we suggest you replace that full side of your fence. If more than half are rotted, invest in a new fence — the rot will inevitably spread to your other boards.
  • A storm created major fence damage. The Dallas area experiences over 500 hail events per year. Couple that with high winds, and even the sturdiest fence sustains damage over time.
PSA: If you're in the path of a tornado or major hail storm, ask your insurance company if they'll cover the cost.
  • Your wooden fence is infested. Do you have carpenter ants or termites? Your wood fence may not be salvageable. Call a fence repair company and consult a pest control firm before making a decision.
  • You inherited an eyesore fence. Did you buy the house of your dreams, but it's surrounded by the ugliest fence of all time? Start life in your new home with a new fence to match.

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If replacing a your fence makes sense, start thinking about what kind of fence you'd like to replace it with. We have a few material recommendations below

What's The Best Fence Material?

Not sure if your current fence material is right for your property? Do you need information to properly utilize your current fence?

The following information will help you to decide whether to repair or replace your existing fence by listing the pros and cons of popular Dallas fence materials and styles.

Wooden Fence

Wooden fencing is the most common type of Dallas fence material. The most popular wood used in Dallas fences is Westerm Red Cedar. 

Best Use: Property border fencing, privacy fence

Pros: Nothing beats the charm and beauty of a traditional wooden fence. The natural grain is enhanced by paint and stain. HOMR recommends treated lumber for enhanced life span — a treated cedar fence can last upwards of 40 years with proper maintenance.

Cons: Wood requires more upkeep than other fence materials. Restain all wood fences — even treated lumber — every 2 years to protect against moisture, rot and mildew. Homeowners should also keep an eye out for warped boards in their fence panels.

Two popular styles of wooden fences in Dallas are board on board and split rail fencing.

Board-on-Board Fence

A cedar, board-on-board fence with a top cap. The fence goes around a corner, and looks washed out as it needs to be stained.
A common board-on-board fence you'll see all over Dallas - this one needs some TLC.

Best Use: Privacy fence, border fence, pet fencing

Pros: Board on board is the best wood option for a privacy fence, since there are no gaps in the material. It also keeps your pets safely in your yard. Add pickets to your design for a visually pleasing fence line.

Cons: Board on board fencing takes longer to install and requires more materials to fill the space. Your cost will be higher as a result. It’s also easier for rot and mildew to travel across your fence, as all your boards are touching.

Split Rail Fence

A pine split-rail fence. It has a wooden stake with two holes in the middle this is the "split-rail" and makes up the posts of the fence. long pieces of wood are fed through the holes to form the barrier of the fence
A split-rail fence - fairly uncommon inside the city limits, but you find them in the areas around White Rock Lake, horse farms, and other facilities with large open areas.

Best Use: Long stretches of fencing, ranch land, property borders

Pros: Besides the pros of any wood fence, a split rail fence is as “Texas” as you get. It's simple to maintain a split rail fence — it's not board-on-board construction, so rot and moisture damage doesn't travel down the fence as quickly. It's a great option for large properties, ranch land, or attractive property borders.

Cons: Split rail fences afford zero privacy. They also don't keep anyone out of your property. If you're worried about privacy, a split rail fence isn't a good option. It also retains the same issues as other wood fences.

Chain Link Fence (Steel Fence)

A 4 ft. tall chain link fence with green chain-link for rust resistance. there is a creek on the other side of the fence and some trees in the foreground and distance
The 4ft. variety of chain link is the one you'll see most commonly on residential properties.

Best Use: Protection for pets and children, border fencing with a view

Pros: A chain link fence is as economical as it gets. It provides a great way to keep kids and animals in your yard while still keeping an open view of the street. A handy homeowner can install his or her own replacement chain link sections.

Cons: If you don't like the look of a chain link fence, nothing you do to it will change your mind. It's a purely functional option, and won't enhance your property's curb appeal. Due to hail and rain, Dallas homeowners expect to remove rust from metal fencing every 18-24 months.

Wrought Iron Fence

A wrought iron fence with stone columns in between. There is a lawn in the background and a metal mail box on one of the stone columns
Wrought iron - all the benefits of chain-link with a much better look

Best Use: Security fencing, beautiful property border fencing

Pros: Toughness is a huge plus of wrought iron fencing. If properly painted and coated, wrought iron has very few durability issues. It’s also a visually stunning fence material that brings a sense of historic charm and beauty.

Cons: The cost of wrought iron is a bit higher due to material and installation concerns. It’s a very heavy material, which makes installation more labor intensive. While they’re great security fences, wrought iron fences are also see-through.

Aluminum Fence

A gray alumninum fence in front of a tuscan courtyard with windows and stones in the background. Some of the windows have shutters next to them. The fence has a gate and looks very industrial
Aluminum fences are beginning to be seen more commonly in the metroplex

Best Use: Ornamental and decorative fencing, garden border fencing

Pros: Aluminum fence materials are great in high humidity. They don't attract moisture, which means virtually zero concerns about corrosion, rust or infestation. Aluminum materials are ⅓ as heavy as steel and iron and are 100% recyclable. Aluminum is also the cheapest metal fencing option on the market.

Cons: Aluminum's lightweight construction means it doesn't withstand heavy storm and hail damage as well as steel or iron. It also does not afford as much security as metal or treated wood, as it's easier to break. Aluminum is meant to be more decorative, and doesn't offer ideal privacy.

Now that you know all about the fence materials you own, let's answer the biggest questions you have left.

5 Dallas Fence Repair Questions and Answers

We asked HOMR members their biggest questions about fence repair and replacement. We also researched the most popular questions that homeowners asked Google about residential fencing.

Let's answer the 5 major questions you have about fence repair in Dallas.

1. Do I need a permit to repair a fence in Dallas?

Dallas City Hall states a permit is needed for Dallas fence repair if you repair or replace over 25% of one side of the fence. The primary reason is to ensure property lines are respected, and that you and your neighbors don’t build on each other’s property.

If you are making smaller fence repairs, you do not need a permit.

If you need a permit from Dallas City Hall, the minimum is $100 and cost escalates based on scope of work. Most fence companies will pull the permit for the job for you.

2. Do I need a permit to replace a fence in Dallas?

If you're building a new fence in Dallas, you need a permit if any of the following apply:

  • The fence or wall is over 4 feet high in a front yard; or
  • The fence is over 6 feet high anywhere else on your private property. 

As of 2023, your fence may not exceed 9 feet in height anywhere on your lot.

Specific Dallas neighborhoods have their own rules about fence installation. There's a handy zoning map on the Dallas City Hall website.

3. Who's responsible for fence repair — my neighbor or me?

This really depends on whether your fence falls over. If the fence falls on your property, it's your responsibility to repair it. If it falls on their property, repairs are their responsibility.

If you want to make fence repairs to avoid a fallen fence, that's your prerogative. Speak to your neighbor about splitting costs, as long as the fence is on a shared property line.

4. Can my Dallas HOA deny my fence or fence repair?

As of 2021, Texas homeowners associations (HOAs) cannot deny building a fence — as long as it's for security. The same goes for fence repairs. 

As long as you can prove your fence repair is required for security, an HOA cannot reject the work.

5. How long will my fence material last?

Once you repair or replace old materials, how long will your new fence last?

Metal and Chain Link Fencing

New metal or chain link fencing lasts longer than any other option. It’s not unusual for new metal fencing to last over 40 years with proper maintenance.

Vinyl (Polyvinyl) Fencing

New polyvinyl fencing can last 20 to 25 years. Choose vinyl fence material that's coated with titanium oxide to protect against UV damage, which extends its lifespan.

Wooden Fencing

Treated cedar and redwood fencing can last up to 40 years if it's regularly sealed to protect against moisture. Treated pine and spruce fencing lasts 15-20 years with regular maintenance.

Untreated cedar fencing lasts 15-20 years with regular maintenance. Untreated pine and spruce fencing lasts 4-10 years before it must be replaced.

As stated earlier, all wooden fencing should be stained every 2 years. Untreated wood should be sealed annually to extend its lifespan.

Featured Partners

No items found.
Aledo
Godley
Caddo Mills
North Richland Hills
Ponder
Frisco
Midlothian
Grandview
Lake Worth
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Irving
Poolville
White Rock
Itasca
DeSoto
Valley View
Lancaster
Lone Oak
Springtown
East Fort Worth
Stockyards
Rockwall
Bluffview
Old East Dallas
Southern Methodist University
Millsap
Balch Springs
Roanoke
Oak Cliff
Cockrell Hill
Bridgeport
Downtown Fort Worth
Milford
Ladonia
South Fort Worth
Southwest Dallas
West
Whitt
Yale Park
Northwest Dallas
Willow Bend
Paradise
Nemo
Chico
Red Oak
Wolfe City
Bishop Arts District
Italy
Vickery Meadow
Addison
Sanger
Celina
Cleburne
Perrin
Colleyville
St. Paul
West Dallas
Love Field
Little Elm
Quinlan
West End
Krum
Newark
North Dallas
Hutchins
Nevada
Kessler Park
Lewisville
Design District
Forney
Justin
Denton
Uptown
Anna
Leonard
Lake Dallas
Venus
Wylie
Northrich
North Fort Worth
Alvord
Kemp
Farmers Branch
South
Sunnyvale
Keene
McKinney
Decatur
Lakewood
Terrell
Grapevine
Mineral Wells
Highland Village
Coppell
Murphy
Blue Ridge
Keller
Stemmons Corridor
Ennis
Eagle Mountain

Conclusion

A home in Dallas just doesn't feel complete without a fence. Whether you like the classic charm of split rail fences, the security of steel and wrought iron fences, or the modern convenience of aluminum and vinyl, it's important to have a yearly maintenance and repair plan in place.

Yes, you can save money on some DIY fence repairs like staining and board replacement. But some jobs require professional repair services. In those moments, you can turn to us for help.

HOMR handles every step of the home management process for you. We research top DFW fence contractors, compare prices and reviews, and present in-depth estimates for your review. Then, we help schedule and rate your service call.

It costs $4000 - $8,000 to replace a Dallas fence. It costs $9 per month to join HOMR. We think you should join us and save the money.

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Linear feet
This is how long your fence is - measured along the ground.
ft
Number of gates
-
+
Do you want a top cap?
Top caps are 2x4 trim pieces put along the top of the fence
Fence Height
Fence type
Board-on-board fences overlap so there are no gaps. Side-by-side use less materials but can be seen through. Learn more
Wood type
Stain preference
What kind of finish do you want on your fence? 
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Explicabo sunt laboriosam rerum. Et qui omnis qui alias error placeat commodi illum possimus. Occaecati corrupti deleniti.
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Estimated total fence cost
$ 1300.00

Don’t be shocked, there are tons of ways to save money on a fence. Chat with our team when you are ready – we are here to help!

If you're looking for a fence contractor in Dallas: read our "who to hire" series where we built a bunch of fences to see who has the best fence for the best price

Estimated Total
$ 12,500.00